Afraid of Rodents and Bugs? 2021 May Not Be Your Year

Batzner pest control in Wisconsin - Serving New Berlin, Green Bay, Milwaukee, Madison, Racine and surrounding areas

Entomologists from Batzner’s parent company, Rentokil Provide their Pest Predictions for 2021

READING, Penn. (Jan. 4, 2021) — As if 2020 didn’t present enough challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, 2021 could be a banner year for pests around the country.

To help residents prepare for 2021, entomologists from Rentokil used field knowledge and data to provide their predictions for pests in the upcoming year.

1. Rodents, Rodents Everywhere:

With shutdowns across the country, it’s no surprise that rodents are on the rise nationwide. Empty buildings, the scarcity of food and warmer winters have combined to create a rodent apocalypse.

“We’re seeing more rats in urban, suburban and rural settings because of the shutdowns,” said Marc Potzler, Board Certified Entomologist. “Food sources are cut off, and rats are having to travel to scavenge for food. We’ve seen rats out in public during the day, which is highly unusual.”

Warmer winters have also allowed for mice populations to boom in residential areas as it allows for a longer breeding season and there is a lower population loss due to hard freezes.

“Right now is the perfect time to rodent-proof your home,” said Potzler. “Make sure to repair any gaps on the exterior of your home, such as around garage doors, windows or pipes.”

2. Mosquitoes on the Move:

Mosquitoes populations have been increasing over the last few years. Aedes species, which are disease-carrying mosquitoes, are also moving to new areas. These mosquitoes can carry West Nile Virus, Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) and Zika virus, among other diseases.

“There is an increase of mosquitoes across the country, but notably on the West Coast, and they are adapting each year,” said Eric Sebring, Associate Certified Entomologist. “We have seen evidence of behavior adaptation, where mosquitoes lay their eggs strategically to hatch throughout the season.”

Protect yourself and your family from mosquitoes by removing any standing water on your property. Mosquitoes can breed in as little as one teaspoon of water. Also, wear EPA-approved insect repellent while spending time outside.

3. Bed Bugs:

The chatter about bed bugs was quiet in 2020, but that’s not because they have gone away.

“As people begin to travel again, we will start to hear about bed bug infestations,” said Sebring. “Bed bugs can be dormant for several months at a time, so they can emerge when a food source, humans, become available.”

Bed bugs are considered hitchhikers, traveling from place to place on people, luggage, clothing and other personal belongings. Homeowners and businesses such as hotels, colleges, hospitals, senior living facilities, retail stores, and libraries have experienced problems with bed bugs.

If traveling, inspect the bed by pulling back the sheets to examine the mattress. Check your luggage before packing and unpacking, and look for signs of living or dead bugs the size of an apple seed or black fecal smears.

4. More Time Outdoors = More Pests.

From hiking to gardening to dining al fresco, there is no doubt that the pandemic has forced people to spend more time outdoors.

In 2021, we will see the outdoor pest pressures continue:

Ticks: Ticks are responsible for transmitting several diseases, including Lyme disease, to humans and animals. These small insects are found in grassy areas and in the woods, so it is important to inspect yourself and your pets after spending time outdoors. Cover as much skin as possible while outdoors, wear long pants, long sleeves, closed-toed shoes, and tuck pant legs into socks. Light-colored clothing will also help any ticks you pick up stand out.

Ants: “As soon as the weather starts to warm up, we will see an increase in ant populations,” said Tom Dobrinska, Board Certified Entomologist. “Most of the ants we are dealing with are odorous house ants. When spending time outside, make sure to clean up any food, water or sugary substances and ensure that your home is free of any holes or cracks for them to enter.”

Stinging Insects: Stinging insects, such as wasps and yellow jackets, emerge at the first sign of warm weather, and as warm weather seasons are getting longer, stinging insects have more time to create issues. Make sure you check for nests early in the spring as they are smaller and get early nest treatment. Make sure to keep windows and doors shut, and secure outside bins so stinging insects are not attracted to the contents.

5. Termites Aren’t Going Anywhere

Termites are a pesky problem, and unfortunately, are not going anywhere. Termites can cause extensive damage to structures, especially homes. As people are moving out of cities during the pandemic to more suburban areas, education about termite protection is key.

“We received more calls for termites this past year than we have in many years,” said Potzler. “It’s important to raise awareness for homeowners now to have proactive protection to keep from costly repairs in the future.”

6. Pests in the News:

There are a few pests that will continue to steal the limelight in 2021.

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an invasive pest that has been making its way across the country since it was first introduced from Asia in 2001. Besides its pungent odor, this stink bug has become a nuisance for homeowners as it gathers in large numbers on the sides of houses and buildings and enters through small cracks in the home. “The brown marmorated stink bug is here to stay,” said Dobrinska. “We will continue to see this species emerge in late spring in large numbers.”

The Spotted Lanternfly will continue to wreak havoc across the Northeast and beyond. The invasive pest, first found in Pennsylvania in 2014, is spreading across the Northeast, with New York reporting its first sighting this year. The pest can significantly damage trees and plants.

“The Spotted Lanternfly is becoming a big problem in the Northeast, and it will continue to spread,” said Potzler. “It can be devastating for agriculture and is a nuisance for homeowners.”

The egg masses look like a smear of mud on trees and outside of homes. It’s important to scrape the egg mass off, put it in a bag with rubbing alcohol and throw it away, and then call the state department of agriculture.

The infamous “Murder Hornet,” also known as the Asian giant hornet, grabbed many headlines, causing homeowners to panic trying to decipher the difference between stinging insects in their yards and this aggressive species. The Asian giant hornet is the largest hornet species in the world, growing up to 3 inches in length. Currently, the Asian giant hornet has only been found in the Pacific Northwest.

“We know that there was one colony found and eliminated in Washington State,” said Sebring. “Unfortunately, if there is one, there will be more.”

While your chances of being stung by an Asian giant hornet are fairly low, the sting can be dangerous as the venom volume is higher, causing more pain. The hives are primarily built underground or in hollows in trees. If you suspect it is an Asian giant hornet or any stinging pests, call your pest management provider to assess the situation as soon as you spot activity.

Pest Seasonality in Wisconsin

Stink bugs are a seasonal pest problem in Wisconsin - Batzner Pest Control

Here in Wisconsin, pests are a problem all year-long. Different weather conditions and seasonality plays a large role in what pests are most active during certain parts of the year. Some pests that prefer warmer weather nearly disappear in the winter, while other pests in the fall will overwinter in your home until spring rolls around. To better prepare yourself for a possible infestation, it’s important to know which pests are common during certain parts of the year. With information from the NPMA, we are here to share all you need to know about pest seasonality in Wisconsin.

Fall & Winter Pests

Colder weather and snow will always drive more pests indoors in the fall and winter months. In 2020, it has been predicted that a milder winter than usual will result in prolonged Asian lady beetle and stink bug activity. Tick problems may also be active for longer this season. Other pests to be wary of during the colder months of the year in Wisconsin include rodents, boxelder bugs, carpenter ants, and more.

Winter pests in the Great Lakes United States map
 
Beetles
 
Stink Bugs
 
Ticks

Spring Pest Problems

Pest activity springs back into action once winter comes to an end. Blooming flowers, warming temperatures, and heavy rainfall encourages pests of all kinds to resume activity and reproduce. The common spring pests in Wisconsin include:

  • Ants. Certain ant species will forage for food in the warmer months. Rainy weather also drives ants out of their colonies and into homes for shelter.
  • Termites Every spring, termites leave their nests to mate and start new colonies. This is called “swarming”.
  • Mosquitoes. When we experience heavy rainfall, mosquito season will burst into life. With their peak season in the months following, they start to be more active in the spring.
  • Bed Bugs. While these are a year-round problem, increased traveling in the springtime always leads to an increase in bed bug activity.

Summer Pest Threats

Summertime in Wisconsin is the busiest pest season. Summer temperatures cause many types of pest colonies to mature and grow in size. Here are the ones to look out for in Wisconsin:

  • Mosquitoes. These parasitic insects lay more eggs in the summer and tend to be our biggest pest problem this time of year.
  • Stinging insects. Wasps, bees, and hornets are at full force in the summertime. They can build nests near residential areas.
  • Flies. Summer is the peak breeding season for flies. They are infamous for being a nuisance at outdoor summer events.
  • Termites. Warm weather is when termites are able to thrive and cause the most damage.

Year-Round Pests in Wisconsin

To better prepare yourself for an infestation, it’s important to understand the pest seasonality here in Wisconsin. Our colder winters may deter some pests, but they also can drive certain pests right into our homes. To protect your property from pests year-round, contact the pest control experts at Batzner.

How to Identify a Wasp Nest

how to identify a wasp nest in Wisconsin - Batzner Pest Control

If you’ve seen a growing number of wasps near your home, there could be a nest nearby! Different types of these stinging insects build different types of nests, making it important to learn how to identify a wasp nest. When it comes to nests, it’s important to be extremely cautious around them. Many types of wasps are very defensive when it comes to defending their nest. Even if it looks abandoned, always exercise caution. The team at Batzner Pest Control is here to share all you need to know when it comes to identifying wasp nests you may come across in Wisconsin.

What do Wasp Nests Look Like?

The below stinging insects build different types of nests. They can be identified by the following features and characteristics:

  • Yellowjackets. Nests are a papery material and have a single opening. The inside of a yellowjacket nest can have up to 100 tiers of cells. Yellowjackets can also build underground nests that can be enormous in size.
  • Paper wasps. Their nests famously look like upside-down umbrellas. These nests are often open, and can get quite large in size. They are typically supported by a single stalk and consist of a paper-like material.
  • Mud daubers. True to name, these nests are made out of mostly mud. The nests are small and tubular in size, often looking like organ pipes. They are typically found in cracks or crevices.
  • Bald-faced hornets. These nests are almost always at least three feet off the ground. They are made of chewed wood fibers mixed with saliva. They often grow to be the size of a football or basketball.

Wasp nests in Wisconsin - Batzner Pest Control

Where are Wasp Nests Found?

Wasp nests can be found in a variety of areas. Paper wasp nests can be located under and within the eaves of structures, in attics and wall voids, and in other enclosed areas. Yellowjackets favor areas near the ground, in hollow trees, under porches, and a number of other areas. Mud daubers tend to build their nests in sheltered areas, including under eaves, garages, attics, or on the sides of buildings. Lastly, the bald-faced hornet builds its nest oftentimes in trees, bushes, or wooded areas.

How to Get Rid of a Wasp Nest

If you notice a large number of wasps flying to and from a specific area, there is a high chance there is a nest nearby. It’s never recommended to deal with wasp nests on your own. Certain wasps can sting multiple times and tend to get especially aggressive when they feel threatened. If you spot a nest, always contact your local wasp control experts at Batzner.

Allergy Awareness Month: Are Pests Triggering Your Allergies?

Springtime allergies may be triggered by pests in Wisconsin - Batzner Pest Control

Spring in Wisconsin is looked forward to each year by residents. However, no one looks forward to springtime allergies every year! May is Allergy and Asthma Awareness Month, making it important to stay aware of what may be contributing to your allergy symptoms this time of year. Everyone knows that blooming trees and changing weather can bring on your allergies, but could they be triggered by something else, too? Believe it or not, pests are a major contributor to allergies and asthma. Certain household pests such as roaches and dust mites can be troublesome for people, especially children. At Batzner Pest Control, we are dedicated to keeping our customers protected from all dangers of pests–allergies included. Keep reading for our tips on preventing pest allergens in your property.

Pest Allergens in Wisconsin

Over the past few decades, research has proven that some common household pests may trigger springtime allergies in people. The main culprit of pest allergens? Cockroaches! Roach droppings, saliva, shed skins, and other parts contain allergen proteins that cause allergic reactions and trigger asthma symptoms. Children are especially vulnerable to roach-triggered asthma attacks, which is why it’s important to know what’s causing your allergies this time of year.

In addition to roaches, some species of stinging insects (yellow jackets, wasps, fire ants, and more) can cause reactions in people. Symptoms range from itching and hives to more serious conditions, all of which is typically different than your average springtime allergy symptoms. If you experience symptoms of an allergic reaction such as swelling, wheezing, dizziness, or trouble breathing, call or visit a medical professional ASAP.

6 Tips to Prevent Pest-Triggered Allergies

Thankfully, routine pest prevention techniques will go a long way to help prevent pest allergens in your home. No pests means no pest allergens. Some of the pest prevention tips to implement include:

  1. Seal cracks and holes in your property, including entry points for utilities and pipes, screen doors, and windows.
  2. Store food in sealed containers and clean kitchens on a daily basis.
  3. Dispose of garbage regularly and use a tight-fitting lid on the can.
  4. Keep your basements and crawl spaces well-ventilated and free of moisture problems.
  5. Wash blankets, rugs, and bedding in hot water often or get them dry-cleaned.
  6. Vacuum and dust your property on a regular basis this season and all year long.

Prevent Pests to Prevent Allergies!

Pests may cause allergies, but they can also bring many other types of dangers into your home. If you have implemented the above pest prevention tips and are still dealing with allergy-causing pests, call the team at Batzner today. We are committed to keeping you and your family safe from the dangers of pests this spring and all year long!

Springtime Pests to Prevent

Prevent spring pests by spring cleaning your New Berlin or Oshkosh WI home. Get tips from Batzner Pest Control!

Many rejoice the arrival of spring…pests included. As winter wraps up, many types of insects and pests will come out in search of food and to breed. Warmer weather encourages their activity, making it important to protect your home against the onslaught of pests now!  There are several things you can do to lessen the risk of an infestation in your Wisconsin home this time of year. Read on to learn more from the experts at Batzner Pest Control!

Springtime Pest Problems

While some of these pests are active year-round, there tends to be a peak in activity in the springtime. There are several types of pests in particular that cause property owners a lot of grief this time of year:

  1. Ants. With warmer weather comes hoards of ants in your home.
  2. Flies. In the spring and summer, flies are more active than ever and can be a big nuisance.
  3. Rodents. Although they’re active year-round, rats and mice are a problem in the spring.
  4. Stinging insects. Wasps and hornets are gearing up to build nests this time of year.
  5. Stink bugs. After overwintering, people report a resurgence in stink bugs.

Preventing Pests in the Spring

If you’re planning on doing some spring cleaning this year, it’s smart to implement pest prevention measures while you’re at it. Clean your windows and doors, and make sure there are no cracks or crevices. If there are, seal them properly. Consider deep cleaning your carpets by vacuuming, shampooing, or steam-cleaning them. Thoroughly sanitize your kitchen with a focus on your appliances. Crumbs and spilled liquids are easy bait for rodents, cockroaches, and more!

Remove debris from your yard, and trim back tree branches away from your home. Ensure your plumbing is working properly and fix any leaks. In general, tidy up your home. Clean under furniture, wipe down surfaces, and inspect areas of your home that need fixing up.

How to Get Rid of Seasonal Pests

If you’ve done all you can to prevent pests this spring but still are dealing with flies, rats, or stink bugs, it’s best to enlist the help of a professional pest control company. At Batzner, our exterminators will work with you to develop a custom pest control plan that will keep you and your family safe from pests all year long.

Why You Shouldn’t DIY Stinging Insects: Bees, Wasps, Hornets

Now that summer is in full swing, I bet your grill has been getting a work out. The last thing you want is for your barbecue to be interrupted by pesky stinging insects. Whether it’s hornets, wasps, or bees, they can send you and your family running back in the house abandoning your perfectly grilled burgers. Your first instinct might be to run to the closest store to pick a can of something claiming it will get rid of your problem. The over-the-counter product you buy might work for a day or two, but the truth is that it can only address insects present at the time of treatment, which is why this DIY method often does not work. Insects that were out of the nest during the treatment will not be affected by the product when they return back to the nest. When choosing a do-it-yourself treatment, your problems will likely persist.

A pest control company can correctly identify the breed of stinging insects in order to safely and thoroughly treat the infestation. Highly trained and certified professionals know the difference between all breeds of stinging insects and treat nests based on that determination. A pharmaceutical-grade product is used that not only addresses present insects, but the residual properties of the product also takes care of insects that were absent from the nest at the time of treatment.

Batzner Pest Control’s service is about a trained, certified professional knowing how to identify and treat an issue safely and thoroughly, and a service that is guaranteed. Our services carry a warranty until the end of the calendar year which allows for additional services at no charge if the problem is not resolved. Call Batzner Pest Control at 866-591-3519 or contact us online for your free estimate so you can get back outside and enjoy your burgers!

Pests That Trigger Allergies and Asthma: Stinging Insects, Cockroaches, Dust Mites

It may be prime time for seasonal allergy sufferers in Wisconsin, but there may be another cause of asthma and other allergic reactions lurking in or around your home: pests!

Stinging Insects

Those who suffer from stinging insect allergies may show signs from itching and hives, to more serious symptoms such as shortness of breath and anaphylaxis, which is a potentially fatal reaction. An allergic reaction occurs when the immune system overreacts to an allergen. In stinging insect allergies, the allergen is venom from a sting. Most serious reactions are caused by four types of insects:

  • Yellow jackets are black with yellow markings. Their nests are usually located underground, but sometimes found in the walls of buildings, cracks in masonry or in woodpiles.
  • Honey bees have round, fuzzy bodies with dark brown and yellow markings. They can be found in honeycombs in trees, old tires or other partially protected sites.
  • Paper wasps are slender with black, brown, red and yellow markings. They live in a circular comb under eaves, behind shutters or in shrubs and woodpiles.
  • Hornets are black or brown with white, orange or yellow markings. Their nests are gray or brown and are usually found in trees.

Cockroaches

What you may be surprised to know is that cockroaches are actually one of the leading causes of asthma symptoms in children. This may result in difficulty sleeping and wheezing, itchy skin, throat and nose, as well as inflamed eyes and ears. While adults may also have these symptoms, children are particularly sensitive to the cockroach droppings, saliva, shed skins and remains that contain potent allergen proteins. Every aspect of a cockroach will become a component of your home’s dust, potentially leading to an asthma attack. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation has indicated at least 78% of urban homes contain cockroaches, while the suburbs also see their fair share.

Dust Mites

Dust mites are also extremely common in the home, and symptoms include congestion, cough, facial pressure, itchy and watery eyes, and postnasal drip. Dust mites, close relatives of ticks and spiders, are too small to see without a microscope. Dust mites eat skin cells shed by people, and they thrive in warm, humid environments. In most homes, such items as bedding, upholstered furniture, pillows, curtains and carpeting provide an ideal environment for dust mites. The waste products of dust mites, not the mites themselves, are what cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Throughout its short life span, a single dust mite may produce as much as 200 times its body weight in waste products. Dust mite waste contains a protein that is an allergen. An allergen is a substance that provokes an allergic reaction. By taking steps to reduce the number of dust mites in your home, you may get control of dust mite allergy.

How Can the Pests Be Managed?

Batzner Pest Control and the National Pest Management Association recommend the following tips for safeguarding homes against pests that cause asthma and allergies:

  • Keep food sealed and stored properly, and clean kitchen floors and counters daily.
  • Dispose of garbage regularly and store in sealed containers.
  • Seal cracks and holes in homes, including entry points for utilities and pipes and in screen doors and windows.
  • Keep basements and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Consider a dust mite allergy cover for your bed.
  • Hard surface flooring may also be helpful to lessen the allergic effects of dust mites.
  • Vacuum at least once a week using a vacuum with a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate) filter.
  • If allergic to stinging insects, learn how to use an epinephrine kit and carry it with you at all times.
  • Should you experience symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as tongue and throat swelling, wheezing, dizziness, or shortness of breath, call 911.

If you suspect a cockroach infestation or notice a hive or nest on your property, contact Batzner Pest Control to identify and safely treat your home.

Carpenter Bees Make Their Presence Known In WI

The current favorite for “Rookie Pest of the Year” has to be the carpenter bee. These bumble bee look-a-likes have generated a lot of buzz this summer, as most homeowners in Wisconsin previously had little to no experience with them.

Identifying Carpenter Bees
Carpenter bees’ appearance differs from bumble bees slightly, as they are of a similar size but with a shiny black abdomen instead of a hairy abdomen with yellow markings. Their behavior, however, is much different. Carpenter bees get their name from the way they excavate tunnels in wood to build their nests. Nests usually consist of tunnels half of an inch in diameter and 6-10″ deep and may include several brood chambers. Many homeowners notice the small holes across the sides of wooden surfaces around their home. This can become problematic to the aesthetic appeal of a home, deck, or fence, and in some extreme cases can even threaten the structural integrity of the wood. They prefer the wood from redwood, cedar, pine, and cypress trees and target wood that is unpainted, untreated, and weathered. Male carpenter bees are also very aggressive and, despite not having a stinger, will dive-bomb the heads of people who come too close to nesting sites. Female carpenter bees can sting in defense if provoked.

Why are they here?
Carpenter bees’ expansion into northern states is explained as a natural progression of their territory as populations become more acclimated to colder weather conditions. The amount of inquires we have received from current and potential clients is proof that carpenter bees have arrived in strength, and their arrival offers a new challenge for homeowners in Wisconsin.

What can you do?
The carpenter bee emergence reminds us that the pest control industry is always evolving, and of how important it is to receive quality service and consultation from experienced professionals.

Incorrect treatment of carpenter bees can actually cause them to do further damage to the wood, so we recommend giving us a call at (262) 797-4160 or requesting a free estimate!

Prepare for the Height of Stinging Insect Season in Wisconsin

Stinging insects, such as wasps, hornets and bees, can easily ruin your outdoor fun. Most active and aggressive in late summer and early fall, these pests are frequently uninvited guests at many outdoor cookouts. Their stings contain venom capable of causing allergic reactions that send over half a million people to the hospital each year and result in painful swelling even for those without an allergic sensitivity. Severe allergic reactions can involve shortness of breath, dizziness, hives and even anaphylactic shock.

If you have been stung by a bee or wasp and are experiencing any of the above mentioned signs of allergic reaction, proceed to the hospital for immediate inspection.

Differences Between Bees and Wasps
Bees, including honey bees and bumble bees, feature hairy bodies and play a vital role in pollination. They are generally non-aggressive, though will attack if provoked or threatened.

Wasps are more aggressive than bees and often attack whenever someone invades their space. Yellow jackets, paper wasps and hornets are all wasp subspecies. Yellow jackets are particularly aggressive. Typically building their nests in the ground, they can easily be spurred to attack if stepped on or disturbed in anyway.

Honey bees can sting only once as they have a barb that detaches during the process, causing them to die shortly afterward. However, yellow jackets and paper wasps can sting targets repeatedly. Whether in the presence of bees or wasps, it is important to remain calm and vacate the area slowly to help ensure you are not perceived as a threat.

Avoiding Insect Stings

  • Cover up with pants and long-sleeved shirts when gardening or working outdoors.
  • Avoid walking barefoot in the grass.
  • Take caution when eating or drinking anything sweet. Cover up desserts and sodas.
  • Don’t wear sweet smelling perfumes, hairsprays and deodorants when heading outdoors.
  • Avoid brightly colored clothing; especially clothes with floral patterns.

The best defense to stings is simply to limit exposure to stinging insects, so any nests near your home should be removed. If you attempt to remove the nest yourself, use great caution as this will be perceived as a direct threat on their space and can provoke them to attack. It is best to hire a professionally trained exterminator who is equipped and trained to eliminate any dangerous hive and ensure the infestation does not reemerge in the immediate area.

Why Are Bees and Wasps so Bad in the Fall?

Have you ever been at a fall tailgate and thought, “Wow, there seems to be way more wasps now than during summer?” This experience, combined with the increased interest in stinging insect treatments we see in the fall, prompted me to ask Batzner Associate Certified Entomologist Dave Kusnierek whether stinging insects really are worse in autumn or if it was just my imagination. Here is his response:

Population Size

Problems with stinging insects such as bees, hornets, and wasps do increase in the early fall, mainly because populations are at their largest size around that time of year. The size of the nest has been growing all summer, so in the beginning of fall you start to run into fully mature nests that simply have a higher population than earlier in the summer. The larger nests send out more foragers, increasing the chances that they become a bother to you.

Dietary Changes and Food Availability

During the fall, some species of stinging insects become more aggressive because they are preparing their queen for the winter, and are more protective near the hive. This aggravated behavior is made worse as natural food sources, such as flowers and insects, are depleted with colder weather, and they grow hungry. Many stinging insects also undergo a change in their dietary needs in the fall, switching from requiring proteins to requiring carbs. These factors cause stinging insects to seek out artificial food sources, leading them to become more of a nuisance around outdoor events like festivals and backyard picnics. Our own behavior can also increase run-ins with stinging insects, as doing fall maintenance around the house often leads to areas where stinging insects are likely to build nests.

The best way to stop them from becoming a major problem in the fall is by having an ongoing service to prevent the population from growing too large throughout the summer. The populations will decrease naturally once the weather gets too cold; however, it is still worth it to treat the nests in the fall. The queen will leave the nest to spend winter in a crack or void of a building, so treating the nest before this happens can reduce the likelihood of having a nest built on your property the following year.

If you experience an issue with stinging insects, don’t hesitate to contact us or call (262)797-4160 for more information on our year-round preventive or single treatment stinging insect services!